October 30, 2019 12:00 EST

The Robert J. Morrison Collection

 
Lot 11
 
Lot 11 - Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923-1997)

11

Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923-1997)
Moonscapefrom 11 Pop Artists, Volume I

1965, dedicated in pencil on the reverse 'To Bob & Barbara / R.F. Lichtenstein' (presumably a print outside the edition of 200 plus 50 artist's proofs), Original Editions, New York, publisher. Color screenprint on blue Rowlux.
sheet: 19 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. (50.5 x 60.6cm)
[Corlett, 37]

note:
Created for the first volume of "11 Pop Artists" in 1965, Moonscape is the first editioned piece in which Lichtenstein used Rowlex, a plastic material with shimmery properties. The artist discovered it at a novelty store and found that it offered "a sort of ready-made nature." He used it again for his first series of prints - Ten Landscapes - (see lots 12-15) in which he experimented with different combinations of his own photography, Mylar and screenprinting. As Ruth Fine notes in her introduction to the catalogue raisonné, "Whereas most of Lichtenstein's images have direct sources in printed materials - the comics, the Yellow Pages - the landscapes are wholly invented."

M.L. Corlett, The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein: A Catalogue Raisonné 1948-1997, New York, 2002, p. 23 (Introduction by Ruth Fine).

Sold for $20,000
Estimated at $10,000 - $15,000


 

1965, dedicated in pencil on the reverse 'To Bob & Barbara / R.F. Lichtenstein' (presumably a print outside the edition of 200 plus 50 artist's proofs), Original Editions, New York, publisher. Color screenprint on blue Rowlux.
sheet: 19 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. (50.5 x 60.6cm)
[Corlett, 37]

note:
Created for the first volume of "11 Pop Artists" in 1965, Moonscape is the first editioned piece in which Lichtenstein used Rowlex, a plastic material with shimmery properties. The artist discovered it at a novelty store and found that it offered "a sort of ready-made nature." He used it again for his first series of prints - Ten Landscapes - (see lots 12-15) in which he experimented with different combinations of his own photography, Mylar and screenprinting. As Ruth Fine notes in her introduction to the catalogue raisonné, "Whereas most of Lichtenstein's images have direct sources in printed materials - the comics, the Yellow Pages - the landscapes are wholly invented."

M.L. Corlett, The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein: A Catalogue Raisonné 1948-1997, New York, 2002, p. 23 (Introduction by Ruth Fine).

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