December 5, 2021 14:00 EST

American Art and Pennsylvania Impressionists Featuring the Collection of Virginia and Stuart Peltz

 
Lot 3
 

3

George Inness (American, 1825–1894)
Upland Pasture 

Signed and dated 'G. Inness. 1862' bottom left, oil on canvas
10 x 16 1/8 in. (25.4 x 41cm)

Provenance

Thomas Colville, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut.
Private Collection, Berwyn, Pennsylvania, by 1983.
Knoke Fine Arts, Marietta, Georgia.
Acquired directly from the above.
Private Collection, California.

Sold for $16,380
Estimated at $10,000 - $15,000


 

Signed and dated 'G. Inness. 1862' bottom left, oil on canvas
10 x 16 1/8 in. (25.4 x 41cm)

Provenance

Thomas Colville, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut.
Private Collection, Berwyn, Pennsylvania, by 1983.
Knoke Fine Arts, Marietta, Georgia.
Acquired directly from the above.
Private Collection, California.

Exhibited

"American Collections: Art for Art’s Sake and For the Love of Glass," Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art, Marietta, Georgia, April 8-June 18, 2017 (as Going Home, Medfield, Massachusetts).

Literature

Michael Quick, George Inness: A Catalogue Raisonné, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey and London, Vol. I, pp. 165 (mentioned), 179, 224, fig. 141, no. 198 (illustrated twice).

Note

The present work is an important testament to George Inness' spectacular change of style circa 1862, which coincides with the artist's move to Medfield the same year. Limited in size, the painting is fierce in spirit with a thinly painted foreground - a quick and "gestural" brushwork, as well as pure hues of red and green, which suggest the work was executed directly outdoors, although it is in fact a studio piece. As Michael Quick notes, "this direct-painting style was capable of considerable finesse, retaining its freshness while still rendering persuasive forms in finished studio paintings." In fact, through its quick style, the painting embodies Inness' new, mystical relationship to nature, by which the vivacity of the brushwork should equal the intensity of the emotion felt while examining the landscape. It also responds to the new taste the artist had witnessed in the Boston area (as opposed to New York circles which, up until 1878, didn’t favor the master's bold technique), and that some critics loosely tied with the French Barbizon painters, including Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot and Charles-François Daubigny.

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