Lot 32 - MARTIAL RAYSSE  (FRENCH, B. 1936)

MARTIAL RAYSSE (FRENCH, B. 1936)
UNTITLED (EYES)

Signed, dated 1963 and dedicated 'To Stanley Bard Avec l'amitié de Martial Raysse' verso, mixed media cut-out collage on two sheets of overlapping paper.
24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7cm)

Provenance: Stanley Bard.

note:
Martial Raysse was one of the original members of the 1960s Nouveau Réalisme movement, along with Yves Klein, Raymond Hains and Arman, who were dissatisfied with the dominant trend of abstraction. Instead, they desired to create art that more accurately captured modern life and criticized the post war culture of consumption. The group emphasized the use of ready-made consumer objects in their art, and therefore expelled Raysse from the group when he took up painting on canvas in 1961. Raysse's new approach, which he called the "hygiene of vision," still incorporated real-life objects, as well as photo-silkscreens and bright neon-colored paint. He also employed images of fashion models taken from ads and magazines, making archetypal goddesses of the commercial realm the focus of his art. Yet his work from this period can be characterized by its darker tone- his subjects portrayed as wartime refugees, victims of the age of materialism, contrary to the concurrent Pop movement which alternatively celebrated this culture.

Sold for $50,000
Estimated at $5,000 - $8,000


 

Signed, dated 1963 and dedicated 'To Stanley Bard Avec l'amitié de Martial Raysse' verso, mixed media cut-out collage on two sheets of overlapping paper.
24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7cm)

Provenance: Stanley Bard.

note:
Martial Raysse was one of the original members of the 1960s Nouveau Réalisme movement, along with Yves Klein, Raymond Hains and Arman, who were dissatisfied with the dominant trend of abstraction. Instead, they desired to create art that more accurately captured modern life and criticized the post war culture of consumption. The group emphasized the use of ready-made consumer objects in their art, and therefore expelled Raysse from the group when he took up painting on canvas in 1961. Raysse's new approach, which he called the "hygiene of vision," still incorporated real-life objects, as well as photo-silkscreens and bright neon-colored paint. He also employed images of fashion models taken from ads and magazines, making archetypal goddesses of the commercial realm the focus of his art. Yet his work from this period can be characterized by its darker tone- his subjects portrayed as wartime refugees, victims of the age of materialism, contrary to the concurrent Pop movement which alternatively celebrated this culture.

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