George Paulding Farnham (1825-1927)
silver and enameled vase, for tiffany and co., new york , 1901

Bearing the Tiffany marks for items made specifically for the Pan-American Exposition, the "Viking" vase of baluster form with Celtic inspired entwined strapwork handles, the body inset with semi precious gem stones including citrines and garnets, intricately cut with scroll-work, masks and beaded strapwork, green, yellow and purple enameling at shoulders, masks, base and domed foot.

H: 8 in. Dia. 4 in. Wt. 14 troy oz.

Provenance: Exhibited in the 1901 Buffalo, Pan-American Exposition, this vase shares many similarities with a tea service designed by Farnham and also exhibited at the Pan-American Exposition, now in the collection of the Newark Museum. George Paulding Farnum studied in the studio of Tiffany's chief designer, Edward C. Moore, and in 1885 became his assistant. His skill as a designer and sculptor was recognized by Moore and Charles Lewis Tiffany. At the age of 27 he was selected to create the Tiffany jewelry collection that would be sent to Paris for the Exposition Universelle of 1889. Farnum and Tiffany recieved the gold Medal for jewelry. With Moore's death in 1891, Farnum became Tiffany's chief designer of both jewelry and the silver collections. Inspired by Asian, Islamic and American Indian designs, Tiffany & Co. won awards at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893. For the Pan-American Exposition, Farnum sought new design inspiration from Viking, Byzantine, and Roman artifacts. Artistic disagreements between Farnum and his new employer, Lewis Comfort Tiffany, began with the death of Charles Louis Tiffany in 1902. In 1908, Farnum left Tiffany & Co. and the creation of jewelry and silver to pursue other interests. One of his best known works is the August Belmont Memorial Cup

Sold for $118,750
Estimated at $30,000 - $50,000


 

Bearing the Tiffany marks for items made specifically for the Pan-American Exposition, the "Viking" vase of baluster form with Celtic inspired entwined strapwork handles, the body inset with semi precious gem stones including citrines and garnets, intricately cut with scroll-work, masks and beaded strapwork, green, yellow and purple enameling at shoulders, masks, base and domed foot.

H: 8 in. Dia. 4 in. Wt. 14 troy oz.

Provenance: Exhibited in the 1901 Buffalo, Pan-American Exposition, this vase shares many similarities with a tea service designed by Farnham and also exhibited at the Pan-American Exposition, now in the collection of the Newark Museum. George Paulding Farnum studied in the studio of Tiffany's chief designer, Edward C. Moore, and in 1885 became his assistant. His skill as a designer and sculptor was recognized by Moore and Charles Lewis Tiffany. At the age of 27 he was selected to create the Tiffany jewelry collection that would be sent to Paris for the Exposition Universelle of 1889. Farnum and Tiffany recieved the gold Medal for jewelry. With Moore's death in 1891, Farnum became Tiffany's chief designer of both jewelry and the silver collections. Inspired by Asian, Islamic and American Indian designs, Tiffany & Co. won awards at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893. For the Pan-American Exposition, Farnum sought new design inspiration from Viking, Byzantine, and Roman artifacts. Artistic disagreements between Farnum and his new employer, Lewis Comfort Tiffany, began with the death of Charles Louis Tiffany in 1902. In 1908, Farnum left Tiffany & Co. and the creation of jewelry and silver to pursue other interests. One of his best known works is the August Belmont Memorial Cup

Images *

Drag and drop .jpg images here to upload, or click here to select images.