December 9, 2018 14:00 EST

American Art & Pennsylvania Impressionists

 
Lot 63
 

63

WILLIAM GLACKENS (AMERICAN 1870-1938)
HILLTOP VIEW

Oil on panel
8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4cm)

Provenance: Collection of Roger Powell (per inscription verso).
David David Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (as "Landscape").
R.H. Love Galleries, Inc., Chicago, Illinois.
Private Collection, Alabama.
NOTE:
While a student and throughout the course of his career (often at the request of noted patron Albert Barnes), William Glackens visited Paris to find inspiration in the art of the French Impressionists. The first-hand exposure to the work of Pierre-Auguste Renoir had a profound effect on Glackens' approach to color, and the artist soon adopted a vivid palette with contrasting harmonies.
The present works is exemplary in demonstrating Glackens' use of joyful jewel-like colors and sensual, spontaneous, brushstrokes. Although the work is not dated and the locale is unknown, its style is very close to that of the paintings the artist completed in France after the mid 1910s, a time when his palette considerably brightened and he abandoned urban scenes to focus on portraiture and landscape painting. Regarding Glackens' new color palette in those years, Arthur Hoeber noted, "If Mr. Glackens thus sees his nature, he must enjoy life far more than the ordinarily equipped human, for there is a riot of tone to his vision."

Sold for $13,750
Estimated at $8,000 - $12,000


 

Oil on panel
8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4cm)

Provenance: Collection of Roger Powell (per inscription verso).
David David Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (as "Landscape").
R.H. Love Galleries, Inc., Chicago, Illinois.
Private Collection, Alabama.
NOTE:
While a student and throughout the course of his career (often at the request of noted patron Albert Barnes), William Glackens visited Paris to find inspiration in the art of the French Impressionists. The first-hand exposure to the work of Pierre-Auguste Renoir had a profound effect on Glackens' approach to color, and the artist soon adopted a vivid palette with contrasting harmonies.
The present works is exemplary in demonstrating Glackens' use of joyful jewel-like colors and sensual, spontaneous, brushstrokes. Although the work is not dated and the locale is unknown, its style is very close to that of the paintings the artist completed in France after the mid 1910s, a time when his palette considerably brightened and he abandoned urban scenes to focus on portraiture and landscape painting. Regarding Glackens' new color palette in those years, Arthur Hoeber noted, "If Mr. Glackens thus sees his nature, he must enjoy life far more than the ordinarily equipped human, for there is a riot of tone to his vision."

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