October 25, 2021 10:00 EST

The Alexander Hamilton Collection of John E. Herzog

 
  Lot 6
 

6

[Hamilton, Alexander] [Public Credit, etc.]
Group of 3 Issues of the Gazette of the United States

A collection of three Federalist newspapers reporting some of Alexander Hamilton's achievements as the first Secretary of the Treasury, including his first report as Secretary and his reports on Public Credit

New-York: John Fenno, Saturday, October 31, 1789. No. LVIII. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features a statement excerpted from Hamilton's first report as Secretary of the Treasury (September 19, 1789), being the "General Estimate of Money requisite for the War Department, for the year 1789" (see lot 5); also features John Adams's essay on the American Revolution, Letter VII, from Twenty-six Letters Upon Interesting Subjects, respecting the Revolution of America on the first page, as well as an article on resolutions passed by Congress in the first session regarding the administering of oaths, specifically for the President. Trimmed along top edge, partial old ownership signature at same; left edge worn; lightly toned.

Together with:

New-York: John Fenno, Wednesday, January 20, 1790. No. LXXXI. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features on the second page a "Summary View of the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, submitted to the Hon. House of Representatives of the United States, on Thursday last," reporting Hamilton's First Report on Public Credit (see lot 10), his seminal treatise on American finance (likely written by him, as he often acted as a ghostwriter for the paper). Creasing from original folds; trimmed along top edge, partial old ownership signature at same; left edge worn and starting; lightly toned.

Together with:

Philadelphia: John Fenno, Saturday, January 1, 1791. No. 71, of Vol. II, Whole No. 175. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features on the fourth page an excerpt from Hamilton's second report on public credit, describing his plan for a National Bank—the future First Bank of the United States, and one of his greatest achievements (see lot 14); also included are proceedings from the final session of the first Congress, including debates on the Militia Bill and the public debt. Creasing from original folds; scattered soiling; lightly toned.

A collection of three issues of this famed Federalist newspaper, reporting important excerpts from Alexander Hamilton's reports on Public Credit (see lot 10), as well as an excerpt from his first report as Secretary of the Treasury (also the first report of the new federal government). According to Ron Chernow, Fenno's newspaper was the Federalist's "quasi-official" paper, with Hamilton originally urging Fenno to establish it, and later raising money to rescue it from financial distress. It was the main Federalist mouthpiece against Jeffersonian newspapers—Philip Freneau's National Gazette and Benjamin Franklin Bache's General Advertiser—during the bitter newspaper wars during President George Washington's administration.

Issues 1789, 90, Christie's, New York, William E. Simon Collection of Historical Documents and Rare Books, 6/14/2005, Lot 1035

Sold for $2,268
Estimated at $1,000 - $1,500


 

A collection of three Federalist newspapers reporting some of Alexander Hamilton's achievements as the first Secretary of the Treasury, including his first report as Secretary and his reports on Public Credit

New-York: John Fenno, Saturday, October 31, 1789. No. LVIII. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features a statement excerpted from Hamilton's first report as Secretary of the Treasury (September 19, 1789), being the "General Estimate of Money requisite for the War Department, for the year 1789" (see lot 5); also features John Adams's essay on the American Revolution, Letter VII, from Twenty-six Letters Upon Interesting Subjects, respecting the Revolution of America on the first page, as well as an article on resolutions passed by Congress in the first session regarding the administering of oaths, specifically for the President. Trimmed along top edge, partial old ownership signature at same; left edge worn; lightly toned.

Together with:

New-York: John Fenno, Wednesday, January 20, 1790. No. LXXXI. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features on the second page a "Summary View of the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, submitted to the Hon. House of Representatives of the United States, on Thursday last," reporting Hamilton's First Report on Public Credit (see lot 10), his seminal treatise on American finance (likely written by him, as he often acted as a ghostwriter for the paper). Creasing from original folds; trimmed along top edge, partial old ownership signature at same; left edge worn and starting; lightly toned.

Together with:

Philadelphia: John Fenno, Saturday, January 1, 1791. No. 71, of Vol. II, Whole No. 175. Bifolium sheet, 16 1/4 x 10 in. (413 x 254mm). (4) pp. Printed newspaper, in three columns. Features on the fourth page an excerpt from Hamilton's second report on public credit, describing his plan for a National Bank—the future First Bank of the United States, and one of his greatest achievements (see lot 14); also included are proceedings from the final session of the first Congress, including debates on the Militia Bill and the public debt. Creasing from original folds; scattered soiling; lightly toned.

A collection of three issues of this famed Federalist newspaper, reporting important excerpts from Alexander Hamilton's reports on Public Credit (see lot 10), as well as an excerpt from his first report as Secretary of the Treasury (also the first report of the new federal government). According to Ron Chernow, Fenno's newspaper was the Federalist's "quasi-official" paper, with Hamilton originally urging Fenno to establish it, and later raising money to rescue it from financial distress. It was the main Federalist mouthpiece against Jeffersonian newspapers—Philip Freneau's National Gazette and Benjamin Franklin Bache's General Advertiser—during the bitter newspaper wars during President George Washington's administration.

Issues 1789, 90, Christie's, New York, William E. Simon Collection of Historical Documents and Rare Books, 6/14/2005, Lot 1035

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