June 3, 2018 14:00 EST

American Art & Pennsylvania Impressionists

 
  Lot 18
 
Lot 18 - THOMAS EAKINS  (AMERICAN 1844–1916)

18

THOMAS EAKINS (AMERICAN 1844–1916)
"STUDY FOR THE PORTRAIT OF MRS. CHARLES L. LEONARD"

Signed with artist's initials 'T.E.' bottom right; also inscribed 'Study by/Thomas Eakins' bottom right, oil on board
14 1/8 x 11 in. (35.9 x 27.9cm)
Executed circa 1895.

Provenance: The Artist.
The Estate of the Artist.
The Artist's wife, Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
A gift from the above.
Collection of Charles Bregler, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Collection of Joseph Katz, Baltimore, Maryland.
Knoedler & Co., New York, New York, by 1961.
Acquired directly from the above in 1961.
Collection of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, New York, New York.
Gifted from the above in 1966.
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.
Christie's, New York, sale of March 3, 2001, lot 108.
Acquired directly from the above sale.
Private Collection, New York, New York.
Acquired directly from the above.
Private Collection, New York, New York.
EXHIBITED:
"Thomas Eakins Centennial Exhibition, 1844-1944," Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 8-May 14, 1944, no. 48; and Knoedler & Co., New York, New York, June 5-July 31, 1944, no. 52; and Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 26-June 1, 1945, no. 99 (traveling exhibition).
"The Thomas Eakins Collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden," Smithsonian Institution, Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., May 24-September 5, 1977, no. 82 (illustrated pp. 151-152 in the exhibition catalogue).
LITERATURE:
Alan Burroughs, "Catalogue of the Work of Thomas Eakins (1869-1916)," The Arts, June 1924, vol. 5, p. 330.
Lloyd Goodrich, Thomas Eakins: His Life and Work, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York, 1933, p. 186, no. 286 (illustrated).
Gordon Hendricks, The Life and Work of Thomas Eakins, Grossman, New York, 1974, p. 322, no. 77 (illustrated).
NOTE:
Thomas Eakins was born in Philadelphia in 1844. He started his career in a very traditional way, first enrolling at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and then studying at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Upon his return to Philadelphia in 1870, Eakins developed a taste for portraiture, depicting his family and friends, and exhibiting the finished portraits at local salons and fairs.
The portraits of Eakins convey a striking sense of energy and vitality. As a professor, he encouraged his students to draw and paint directly from the nude models in order to capture the essence of their physical structure. Anatomy and dissection courses became part of his curriculum, and as a young student himself, Eakins attended anatomy lectures at Jefferson Medical College.
Eakins' fascination with the human form may be what connected him with the family of the present sitter, Mrs. Ruth Leonard, the wife of the Philadelphia physician and noted X-ray pioneer and specialist, Dr. Charles Lester Leonard. Regrettably, the finished portrait for which the present lot is a study, no longer exists. When Lloyd Goodrich, Eakins' first biographer, contacted the couple's only daughter about it, she replied: "Unfortunately this portrait met with an accident and is no longer in existence."
Depicted in a three-quarter length format, Mrs. Charles Leonard here sits quietly on a chair, her hands joined in her laps. Dressed in a crimson dress with brown fur around the shoulders, she stands out against the dark brown background, almost like an apparition. The even grid which appears on the portrait suggests it was the final study used to transfer the work to canvas.

Sold for $28,750
Estimated at $15,000 - $25,000


 

Signed with artist's initials 'T.E.' bottom right; also inscribed 'Study by/Thomas Eakins' bottom right, oil on board
14 1/8 x 11 in. (35.9 x 27.9cm)
Executed circa 1895.

Provenance: The Artist.
The Estate of the Artist.
The Artist's wife, Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
A gift from the above.
Collection of Charles Bregler, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Collection of Joseph Katz, Baltimore, Maryland.
Knoedler & Co., New York, New York, by 1961.
Acquired directly from the above in 1961.
Collection of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, New York, New York.
Gifted from the above in 1966.
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.
Christie's, New York, sale of March 3, 2001, lot 108.
Acquired directly from the above sale.
Private Collection, New York, New York.
Acquired directly from the above.
Private Collection, New York, New York.
EXHIBITED:
"Thomas Eakins Centennial Exhibition, 1844-1944," Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 8-May 14, 1944, no. 48; and Knoedler & Co., New York, New York, June 5-July 31, 1944, no. 52; and Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 26-June 1, 1945, no. 99 (traveling exhibition).
"The Thomas Eakins Collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden," Smithsonian Institution, Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., May 24-September 5, 1977, no. 82 (illustrated pp. 151-152 in the exhibition catalogue).
LITERATURE:
Alan Burroughs, "Catalogue of the Work of Thomas Eakins (1869-1916)," The Arts, June 1924, vol. 5, p. 330.
Lloyd Goodrich, Thomas Eakins: His Life and Work, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York, 1933, p. 186, no. 286 (illustrated).
Gordon Hendricks, The Life and Work of Thomas Eakins, Grossman, New York, 1974, p. 322, no. 77 (illustrated).
NOTE:
Thomas Eakins was born in Philadelphia in 1844. He started his career in a very traditional way, first enrolling at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and then studying at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Upon his return to Philadelphia in 1870, Eakins developed a taste for portraiture, depicting his family and friends, and exhibiting the finished portraits at local salons and fairs.
The portraits of Eakins convey a striking sense of energy and vitality. As a professor, he encouraged his students to draw and paint directly from the nude models in order to capture the essence of their physical structure. Anatomy and dissection courses became part of his curriculum, and as a young student himself, Eakins attended anatomy lectures at Jefferson Medical College.
Eakins' fascination with the human form may be what connected him with the family of the present sitter, Mrs. Ruth Leonard, the wife of the Philadelphia physician and noted X-ray pioneer and specialist, Dr. Charles Lester Leonard. Regrettably, the finished portrait for which the present lot is a study, no longer exists. When Lloyd Goodrich, Eakins' first biographer, contacted the couple's only daughter about it, she replied: "Unfortunately this portrait met with an accident and is no longer in existence."
Depicted in a three-quarter length format, Mrs. Charles Leonard here sits quietly on a chair, her hands joined in her laps. Dressed in a crimson dress with brown fur around the shoulders, she stands out against the dark brown background, almost like an apparition. The even grid which appears on the portrait suggests it was the final study used to transfer the work to canvas.

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Thomas Cowperthwait Eakins