February 18, 2021 10:00 EST

Books & Manuscripts

 
  Lot 2
 

2

[Americana] Burrows, William Ward
Group of 3 Autograph Letters, signed, to Jonathan Williams

Washington, D.C., August 26-September 15, 1800. Approximately 10 x 8 in. (254 x 203 mm). Three lengthy autograph letters, signed by United States Marine Corp commander, William Ward Burrows, to Philadelphia lawyer, John Williams, concerning a variety of topics, including the future election of Thomas Jefferson.

William Ward Burrows (1758-1805) served in the Revolutionary War in the South Carolina militia. After the war he settled in Philadelphia and established a successful law firm, and was later appointed first commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps by President John Adams.

Jonathan Williams (1750-1815) was a representative from Pennsylvania, and served as a major in the Second Regiment of Artillerists and Engineers from 1801. He commanded the post at West Point, N.Y., and was made first Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, in 1802. He was promoted through the ranks to colonel, and he planned and built the inner forts for the defense of New York Harbor. He was elected to the Fourteenth Congress and briefly served from March 4, 1815, until his death, in Philadelphia, Pa., May 16, 1815.

Sold for $535
Estimated at $300 - $500


 

Washington, D.C., August 26-September 15, 1800. Approximately 10 x 8 in. (254 x 203 mm). Three lengthy autograph letters, signed by United States Marine Corp commander, William Ward Burrows, to Philadelphia lawyer, John Williams, concerning a variety of topics, including the future election of Thomas Jefferson.

William Ward Burrows (1758-1805) served in the Revolutionary War in the South Carolina militia. After the war he settled in Philadelphia and established a successful law firm, and was later appointed first commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps by President John Adams.

Jonathan Williams (1750-1815) was a representative from Pennsylvania, and served as a major in the Second Regiment of Artillerists and Engineers from 1801. He commanded the post at West Point, N.Y., and was made first Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, in 1802. He was promoted through the ranks to colonel, and he planned and built the inner forts for the defense of New York Harbor. He was elected to the Fourteenth Congress and briefly served from March 4, 1815, until his death, in Philadelphia, Pa., May 16, 1815.

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