October 30, 2019 12:00 EDT

The Robert J. Morrison Collection

 
  Lot 47
 
Lot 47 - Attributed to Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987)

47

Attributed to Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987)
Self-Portrait

1966, bears signature and date, numbered 96/300 verso, with margins, Leo Castelli Gallery, New York, publisher. Offset lithograph on silver coated paper.
sheet: 23 x 22 15/16 in. (58.4 x 58.3cm)
[Feldman & Schellmann, II.16]

note:
Though Warhol produced his first self-portrait while still in art school, it wasn't until the latter part of his career in the 1960s that he began to actively incorporate his own image into his visual repertoire which included portraits of movie stars, athletes, luminaries and socialites whom he greatly admired. By the time the artist produced his 1966 Self Portrait (above), his own public persona had reached the same level of celebrity as those he chose to depict in his artwork. In the words of legendary art critic Robert Rosenblum, "Equating himself with the wealthy, the chic and the famous, he tells us as much about himself as we would know about Marilyn Monroe or Elizabeth Taylor from their images in his earlier paintings. But of course, this disguise as a celebrity can also be read as revelation of Warhol's personal and professional ambitions...to become a star, his private persona hidden, his public persona only to be caught on the wing by a lucky photographer".

Warhol's Self-Portrait from 1966 is the archetype of Andy Warhol's most famous self-representation of the 1960s. More than any other artist, Warhol inextricably bound his image, identity and carefully constructed public persona with his art. As he stated in 1967, "If you want to know about Andy Warhol, then just look at the surface of my pictures, my movies and me and there I am; there's nothing in between."

Sold for $15,000
Estimated at $6,000 - $10,000


 

1966, bears signature and date, numbered 96/300 verso, with margins, Leo Castelli Gallery, New York, publisher. Offset lithograph on silver coated paper.
sheet: 23 x 22 15/16 in. (58.4 x 58.3cm)
[Feldman & Schellmann, II.16]

note:
Though Warhol produced his first self-portrait while still in art school, it wasn't until the latter part of his career in the 1960s that he began to actively incorporate his own image into his visual repertoire which included portraits of movie stars, athletes, luminaries and socialites whom he greatly admired. By the time the artist produced his 1966 Self Portrait (above), his own public persona had reached the same level of celebrity as those he chose to depict in his artwork. In the words of legendary art critic Robert Rosenblum, "Equating himself with the wealthy, the chic and the famous, he tells us as much about himself as we would know about Marilyn Monroe or Elizabeth Taylor from their images in his earlier paintings. But of course, this disguise as a celebrity can also be read as revelation of Warhol's personal and professional ambitions...to become a star, his private persona hidden, his public persona only to be caught on the wing by a lucky photographer".

Warhol's Self-Portrait from 1966 is the archetype of Andy Warhol's most famous self-representation of the 1960s. More than any other artist, Warhol inextricably bound his image, identity and carefully constructed public persona with his art. As he stated in 1967, "If you want to know about Andy Warhol, then just look at the surface of my pictures, my movies and me and there I am; there's nothing in between."

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