November 6, 2011 14:00 EST

Modern & Contemporary Works of Art

 
  Lot 5
 

5

THREE WORKING PROOFSPABLO PICASSO (SPANISH 1881-1973)
"DORMEUSE"

1962, inscribed with the date "10-4-62" of printing presumably by the printer, H. Arnéra, Baer's state II of IVB, (Baer calls for one proof in this state annotated in green crayon verso, the final signed and numbered edition in the fourth, final state in three colors was 50), with wide margins. Color linocut in chocolate over caramel on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, see Baer 1319.II].
and
1962, Baer's state III of IVB, (not in Baer, Baer calls for one or two proofs in this state in two colors, the final signed and numbered edition in the fourth, final state in three colors was 50), with wide margins. Color linocut in chocolate on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, see Baer 1319.III].
and
1962, Baer's state IVA of IVB, pencil signed and inscribed by the printer, 'Linogravure originale de Picasso H. Arnera' verso, (one of two or three proofs in this state before the final signed and numbered edition of 50 in these colors), with wide margins. Color linocut in caramel, chocolate and black on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, Baer 1319.IVA].
(3).

Provenance: The Studio/Estate of Hidalgo Arnéra, Paris, France
Galerie Michael, Beverly Hills, California.
Private Collection, Los Angeles, California.

note:
Unsigned working proofs for most of Pablo Picasso's linoleum cuts are well documented in Brigitte Baer's catalogue raisonné and offer a fascinating glimpse into the artist's working process. In the same way that Picasso's paintings challenged and pushed the traditional definitions of painting, the artist's printmaking techniques were innovative and experimental with wonderful effect.

Linoleum cuts were first invented in the 1860's and enabled artists to create a rich, multi-colored image by inking several different linoleum 'blocks.' Typically, each was cut differently to depict another area of the final image, then inked and layered one over the last to create the final print. Picasso, along with master printer Hidalgo Arnéra however, experimented with using just one block to create his layered images. This was achieved by cutting, inking and impressing just one block over and over into the same sheet of paper so that the finished print was comprised of the differing cuts (states) one over the other.

The present working proofs which originally came directly out of Arnéra's studio offer a unique chance to glimpse the artist testing the effects of these cuts before inking and applying them to his prints. State III of IV (caramel over white) here shows the artist's new cuts to the arms, shoulder and face that ultimately appear in the final state IV of IV.

Estimated at $50,000 - $80,000


 

1962, inscribed with the date "10-4-62" of printing presumably by the printer, H. Arnéra, Baer's state II of IVB, (Baer calls for one proof in this state annotated in green crayon verso, the final signed and numbered edition in the fourth, final state in three colors was 50), with wide margins. Color linocut in chocolate over caramel on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, see Baer 1319.II].
and
1962, Baer's state III of IVB, (not in Baer, Baer calls for one or two proofs in this state in two colors, the final signed and numbered edition in the fourth, final state in three colors was 50), with wide margins. Color linocut in chocolate on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, see Baer 1319.III].
and
1962, Baer's state IVA of IVB, pencil signed and inscribed by the printer, 'Linogravure originale de Picasso H. Arnera' verso, (one of two or three proofs in this state before the final signed and numbered edition of 50 in these colors), with wide margins. Color linocut in caramel, chocolate and black on Arches.
image: 10 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (27.3 x 34.9cm)
[see Bloch 1083, Baer 1319.IVA].
(3).

Provenance: The Studio/Estate of Hidalgo Arnéra, Paris, France
Galerie Michael, Beverly Hills, California.
Private Collection, Los Angeles, California.

note:
Unsigned working proofs for most of Pablo Picasso's linoleum cuts are well documented in Brigitte Baer's catalogue raisonné and offer a fascinating glimpse into the artist's working process. In the same way that Picasso's paintings challenged and pushed the traditional definitions of painting, the artist's printmaking techniques were innovative and experimental with wonderful effect.

Linoleum cuts were first invented in the 1860's and enabled artists to create a rich, multi-colored image by inking several different linoleum 'blocks.' Typically, each was cut differently to depict another area of the final image, then inked and layered one over the last to create the final print. Picasso, along with master printer Hidalgo Arnéra however, experimented with using just one block to create his layered images. This was achieved by cutting, inking and impressing just one block over and over into the same sheet of paper so that the finished print was comprised of the differing cuts (states) one over the other.

The present working proofs which originally came directly out of Arnéra's studio offer a unique chance to glimpse the artist testing the effects of these cuts before inking and applying them to his prints. State III of IV (caramel over white) here shows the artist's new cuts to the arms, shoulder and face that ultimately appear in the final state IV of IV.

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