September 23, 2021 10:00 EST

Books and Manuscripts

 
  Lot 55
 
Lot 55 - [Counter-Culture]

55

[Counter-Culture]
Hell No! Nobody Goes!! End the War (Stop the Draft Week Portfolio)

Menlo Park, California: Nowels Publications for Midpenisula Observer, October 16, 1967. First edition. Small folio. Comprising 20 multicolored sheets (three folding; two supplied in facsimile) reproducing photographs from the Stop the Draft Week protest, by photographers David Anderson, Beth Bagby, Marlene Charyn, Stephen Hettenbach, John McChesney, Tina Ruffa, Maitland Sharpe, Chris Springman, and William Warren; loose as issued. Original limp printed pictorial wrappers; scattered wear and dampstaining, splitting along spine, repair along bottom of same; scattered minor wear, damp wrinkling and soiling to sheets. OCLC locates 2 copies.

A rare suite of photographic prints documenting the Stop the Draft Week protests held from October 16-20, 1967 in Oakland, California. It was one of the earliest and major Anti-War Movement protests, with over 10,000 demonstrators marching throughout the week. The protesters, made up of a coalition of student, labor, peace, and civil rights activists, focused their attention on the Oakland Army Induction Center, with over 3,000 marchers converging on the recruitment center on the first day. Over 200 formed a barricade with their bodies and handed out leaflets in an effort to get recruits to change their mind in joining the war effort. Police repression was swift, as they ordered the demostrators to disperse before attacking them with their nightsticks. Over 20 were injured and more than 40 were arrested. This was one of the first instances of police brutality during the Anti-War Movement protests. By the end of the week large scale confrontations with the police ensued, as the protesters began to fight back. Seven activists (Reese Eherlich, Terence Cannon, Mike Smith, Steve Hamilton, Bob Mandel, Jeff Segal, and Frank Bardacke) were arrested during this week of demonstations and were charged with, "conspiracy to trespass, to commit a public nuisance, and to resist, delay, and obstruct police officers." They became known as the Oakland Seven. This portfolio was apparently created to raise funds for their defense, and they were eventually acquitted of all charges in 1969.

Sold for $535
Estimated at $500 - $800


 

Menlo Park, California: Nowels Publications for Midpenisula Observer, October 16, 1967. First edition. Small folio. Comprising 20 multicolored sheets (three folding; two supplied in facsimile) reproducing photographs from the Stop the Draft Week protest, by photographers David Anderson, Beth Bagby, Marlene Charyn, Stephen Hettenbach, John McChesney, Tina Ruffa, Maitland Sharpe, Chris Springman, and William Warren; loose as issued. Original limp printed pictorial wrappers; scattered wear and dampstaining, splitting along spine, repair along bottom of same; scattered minor wear, damp wrinkling and soiling to sheets. OCLC locates 2 copies.

A rare suite of photographic prints documenting the Stop the Draft Week protests held from October 16-20, 1967 in Oakland, California. It was one of the earliest and major Anti-War Movement protests, with over 10,000 demonstrators marching throughout the week. The protesters, made up of a coalition of student, labor, peace, and civil rights activists, focused their attention on the Oakland Army Induction Center, with over 3,000 marchers converging on the recruitment center on the first day. Over 200 formed a barricade with their bodies and handed out leaflets in an effort to get recruits to change their mind in joining the war effort. Police repression was swift, as they ordered the demostrators to disperse before attacking them with their nightsticks. Over 20 were injured and more than 40 were arrested. This was one of the first instances of police brutality during the Anti-War Movement protests. By the end of the week large scale confrontations with the police ensued, as the protesters began to fight back. Seven activists (Reese Eherlich, Terence Cannon, Mike Smith, Steve Hamilton, Bob Mandel, Jeff Segal, and Frank Bardacke) were arrested during this week of demonstations and were charged with, "conspiracy to trespass, to commit a public nuisance, and to resist, delay, and obstruct police officers." They became known as the Oakland Seven. This portfolio was apparently created to raise funds for their defense, and they were eventually acquitted of all charges in 1969.

Images *

Drag and drop .jpg images here to upload, or click here to select images.