30th Mar, 2014 14:00 EST

The George D. Horst Collection of Fine Art

 
  Lot 7
 

7

Eugène Louis Boudin (French, 1824-1898)
"Estuary with Sailboats and Lighthouses"

Signed, dated and inscribed 'E Boudin 91/Trouville' bottom left, oil on panel
13 3/4 x 10 1/4in. (35 x 26cm)

Provenance

The Public Sale of the Crocker, Newcomb, Moir and Bonner Collections.' American Art Association, New York, New York, January 24, 1912, lot 27.
Acquired from the above auction.
The George D. Horst Collection of Fine Art.

Note

Primarily a marine painter but also an accomplished landscapist as well, Boudin's penchant for brightly hued, sun dappled seas, ports and beaches typically paired with dynamic cloud filled blue skies made him one of the leading painters in 19th century France. Boudin formally began painting at age 22, debuting at the Paris Salon in 1859 - his first of many such exhibitions - eventually earning the distinction of knight of the Legion d'honneur. He was referred to as "king of the skies" by none other than his teacher and the father of Barbizon painting, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and he is said to have advised a then teenage Claude Monet, "I want to show you Honfleur; I want you to see the light." Painting not only in Honfleur, but also his native Deauville, Granville, Bretagne, Touques, and as in the present work, Trouville, Boudin's never wavered from his plein-air approach as a landscapist, his evocative style presaging French Impressionism.

A letter of authenticity from Manuel Schmit will accompany this lot.

Sold for $170,500
Estimated at $40,000 - $60,000


 

Signed, dated and inscribed 'E Boudin 91/Trouville' bottom left, oil on panel
13 3/4 x 10 1/4in. (35 x 26cm)

Provenance

The Public Sale of the Crocker, Newcomb, Moir and Bonner Collections.' American Art Association, New York, New York, January 24, 1912, lot 27.
Acquired from the above auction.
The George D. Horst Collection of Fine Art.

Note

Primarily a marine painter but also an accomplished landscapist as well, Boudin's penchant for brightly hued, sun dappled seas, ports and beaches typically paired with dynamic cloud filled blue skies made him one of the leading painters in 19th century France. Boudin formally began painting at age 22, debuting at the Paris Salon in 1859 - his first of many such exhibitions - eventually earning the distinction of knight of the Legion d'honneur. He was referred to as "king of the skies" by none other than his teacher and the father of Barbizon painting, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and he is said to have advised a then teenage Claude Monet, "I want to show you Honfleur; I want you to see the light." Painting not only in Honfleur, but also his native Deauville, Granville, Bretagne, Touques, and as in the present work, Trouville, Boudin's never wavered from his plein-air approach as a landscapist, his evocative style presaging French Impressionism.

A letter of authenticity from Manuel Schmit will accompany this lot.

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Eugène Louis Boudin

The son of a harbor captain, Eugène Boudin was born in Honfleur, France, in 1824. While a young boy, the artist would accompany his father as a cabin boy on the steamboat ferry between Le Havre and his hometown. That Boudin would go on to capture the majesty of the sea so exquisitely and extensively, therefore, only seems natural. However, Boudin did not begin painting seriously until his early twenties, when the town of Le Havre awarded him with a three-year scholarship, which prompted him to move to Paris and study there.Freeman’s has hosted many successful sales ofBoudin paintings, with several of the artist’s masterful landscapes well exceeding their pre-sale estimates. Boudin’s Estuary with Sailboats and Lighthouses nearly tripled its pre-sale high estimate in 2014, achieving $170,500; La Plage de Bercksold for $162,500 in a 2018 sale, and Environs de Trouvilleachieved $87,500 in 2016.The Dutch painter Johan Jongkind first encouraged Boudin to work outdoors, en plein aira direct departure from the conventional, studio-based mode of the time, and a move that would foreshadow the Impressionist movement. Boudin created sketches, finely detailed pencil drawings, and watercolors at the seaside, then would return to Paris to complete the full paintings in his studio in the winters. His skill at capturing the changingeffects of light on water and sky is the hallmark of his work. Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot once called him “the king of the skies,” and Boudin’s submissions to the 1859 Paris Salon garnered praise from Charles Baudelaire, who rhapsodized, “If you have hadthe leisure to acquaint yourself with these meteorological beauties, you will be able to verify, by memory, the exactness of Monsieur Boudin’s observations...all these depths, all these splendors go to my head like an intoxicating liquor or like the eloquence of opium.” The open and luminous qualities of Boudin’s works was a particular influence to the young Claude Monet, who met Boudin at age seventeen and worked alongside him. Under Boudin’s tutelage, Monet moved away from caricature art and began paintinglandscapes en plein air, learning to appreciate and capture the distinct effects of light that would define his style and later elevate him to prominence.