September 21, 2022 11:00 EST

Books and Manuscripts

 
  Lot 83
 
Lot 83 - [Music] Zappa, Frank

83

[Music] Zappa, Frank
Autograph Music Score

Frank Zappa handwritten score for his 1972 Grand Wazoo tour

(Likely Hollywood, California), ca. August-September, 1972. Three folding printed staved leaves; when opened, 12 1/2 x 28 1/2 in. (317 x 724 mm). Autograph musical score for "Revised Music for Low Budget Symphony Orchestra," completely in the hand of Frank Zappa, for use by trombonist Bruce Fowler. Previous cataloguer notes that this score is "from the collection of Marty Perellis, Zappa's Road Manager during the early 70's, and authenticated by David Ocker, Zappa's music copyist from 1977-84." In fine condition.

A unique musical score entirely in the hand of musician and composer Frank Zappa, for use by trombonist Bruce Fowler during Zappa's Grand Wazoo Tour in September 1972.

The Grand Wazoo tour was noted for its 20-piece orchestra that accompanied Zappa. The orchestra originated in the studio sessions held in the spring of 1972 for Zappa's fourth solo album, the jazz-influenced--and sequel to his 1969 album Hot Rats--Waka/Jawaka. As Zappa explains in the Warner Bros. music magazine Circular (October 9, 1972, Vol. 4, No. 40), published shortly after the completion of the Grand Wazoo tour, "Since the earliest days of the M.O.I. [Mothers of Invention] (from about 1964, roughly), I have been interested in assembling some kind of electric orchestra, capable of performing intricate compositions at the same sound intensity levels normally associated with other forms of pop music. The formation of the new MOTHERS OF INVENTION/HOT RATS/GRAND WAZOO represents the first large-scale attempt to mount such a monstrosity, and to actually move it across a couple of continents to do concerts." (p. 2)

Due to the success of the Wazoo sessions that spring, in the late summer Zappa decided to take the 20-piece orchestra, including Fowler, on an eight-date tour through the United States and Europe. The Wazoo debuted at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday, September 10, 1972, and then traveled to Berlin (9/15), London (9/16), The Hague (9/17), Copenhagen, New York City (9/23), and Boston (9/24), making a final return to Los Angeles on the 25th. As Zappa continues in Circular, "We will play the same concert program for each of the eight events. The pieces include: 'The New Brown Clouds,' 'Big Swifty,' 'Approximate,' 'For Calvin and His Next Two Hitch-Hikers,' 'Think It Over,' 'Low-Budget Dog Meat (a medley),' 'The Adventures of Greggery Peccary,' and, for an encore (because everybody prepares an encore whether they talk about it or not), 'Penis Dimension' and the 'Variant Processional March.' All of the compositions include space for solo improvisations except 'Low Budget Dog Meat' which presents an assortment of recognizable themes from 'Music For Low Budget Symphony Orchestra,' 'The Dog Breath Variations' and 'Uncle Meat.'" (p. 2)

Zappa further elaborates about the musical arrangement of "Low Budget Symphony Orchestra," that featured in the song "Low-Budget Dog Meat": "This selection incorporates themes from three previously recorded pieces, 'Music for Low-Budget Symphony Orchestra' (from the Jean-Luc Ponty album King Kong), 'The Dog Breath Variations' and 'Uncle Meat' (from the M.O.I. album Uncle Meat). This arrangement contains many difficult instrumental passages (some of which are not always played perfectly, but what the heck), notably: the high trombone part in the opening section, the material for electric piano and marimba in the second section, and the intricate theme of the last section which presents a few problems for everybody. Barring any unforeseen problems in the sound mix, the high, quacking 'D' trumpet of Malcolm McNab should amaze you through the latter portions of this." (p. 4). After the first performance of "Low-Budget Dog Meat" at the Hollywood Bowl on September 10, the "Low-Budget Symphony Orchestra" arrangement was dropped, and the song became known simply as "Dog Meat." The "Low Budget" arrangement was briefly reprised in the sound check for the Boston Music Hall show on September 24, but apparently was not performed during the show.

Following his September tour, Zappa retained most of the orchestra, including Fowler, for an October-December tour through the States under the name Petite Wazoo.

Bruce Fowler (b. 1947) first joined Zappa's ensemble in September 1972 for this tour, and stayed with the group until May 1975, and returned in 1988. His two brothers, Tom Fowler (b. 1951) and Walt Fowler (b. 1955) also played with Zappa at various intervals, as a bassist (1973-75) and trumpet player (April-May, 1974), respectively.

Provenance

Marty Perellis

Schubertiade Music LLC, Gabriel Boyers, 2009

From the private collection of Asher D. Atchick, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

Sold for $1,008
Estimated at $800 - $1,200


 

Frank Zappa handwritten score for his 1972 Grand Wazoo tour

(Likely Hollywood, California), ca. August-September, 1972. Three folding printed staved leaves; when opened, 12 1/2 x 28 1/2 in. (317 x 724 mm). Autograph musical score for "Revised Music for Low Budget Symphony Orchestra," completely in the hand of Frank Zappa, for use by trombonist Bruce Fowler. Previous cataloguer notes that this score is "from the collection of Marty Perellis, Zappa's Road Manager during the early 70's, and authenticated by David Ocker, Zappa's music copyist from 1977-84." In fine condition.

A unique musical score entirely in the hand of musician and composer Frank Zappa, for use by trombonist Bruce Fowler during Zappa's Grand Wazoo Tour in September 1972.

The Grand Wazoo tour was noted for its 20-piece orchestra that accompanied Zappa. The orchestra originated in the studio sessions held in the spring of 1972 for Zappa's fourth solo album, the jazz-influenced--and sequel to his 1969 album Hot Rats--Waka/Jawaka. As Zappa explains in the Warner Bros. music magazine Circular (October 9, 1972, Vol. 4, No. 40), published shortly after the completion of the Grand Wazoo tour, "Since the earliest days of the M.O.I. [Mothers of Invention] (from about 1964, roughly), I have been interested in assembling some kind of electric orchestra, capable of performing intricate compositions at the same sound intensity levels normally associated with other forms of pop music. The formation of the new MOTHERS OF INVENTION/HOT RATS/GRAND WAZOO represents the first large-scale attempt to mount such a monstrosity, and to actually move it across a couple of continents to do concerts." (p. 2)

Due to the success of the Wazoo sessions that spring, in the late summer Zappa decided to take the 20-piece orchestra, including Fowler, on an eight-date tour through the United States and Europe. The Wazoo debuted at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday, September 10, 1972, and then traveled to Berlin (9/15), London (9/16), The Hague (9/17), Copenhagen, New York City (9/23), and Boston (9/24), making a final return to Los Angeles on the 25th. As Zappa continues in Circular, "We will play the same concert program for each of the eight events. The pieces include: 'The New Brown Clouds,' 'Big Swifty,' 'Approximate,' 'For Calvin and His Next Two Hitch-Hikers,' 'Think It Over,' 'Low-Budget Dog Meat (a medley),' 'The Adventures of Greggery Peccary,' and, for an encore (because everybody prepares an encore whether they talk about it or not), 'Penis Dimension' and the 'Variant Processional March.' All of the compositions include space for solo improvisations except 'Low Budget Dog Meat' which presents an assortment of recognizable themes from 'Music For Low Budget Symphony Orchestra,' 'The Dog Breath Variations' and 'Uncle Meat.'" (p. 2)

Zappa further elaborates about the musical arrangement of "Low Budget Symphony Orchestra," that featured in the song "Low-Budget Dog Meat": "This selection incorporates themes from three previously recorded pieces, 'Music for Low-Budget Symphony Orchestra' (from the Jean-Luc Ponty album King Kong), 'The Dog Breath Variations' and 'Uncle Meat' (from the M.O.I. album Uncle Meat). This arrangement contains many difficult instrumental passages (some of which are not always played perfectly, but what the heck), notably: the high trombone part in the opening section, the material for electric piano and marimba in the second section, and the intricate theme of the last section which presents a few problems for everybody. Barring any unforeseen problems in the sound mix, the high, quacking 'D' trumpet of Malcolm McNab should amaze you through the latter portions of this." (p. 4). After the first performance of "Low-Budget Dog Meat" at the Hollywood Bowl on September 10, the "Low-Budget Symphony Orchestra" arrangement was dropped, and the song became known simply as "Dog Meat." The "Low Budget" arrangement was briefly reprised in the sound check for the Boston Music Hall show on September 24, but apparently was not performed during the show.

Following his September tour, Zappa retained most of the orchestra, including Fowler, for an October-December tour through the States under the name Petite Wazoo.

Bruce Fowler (b. 1947) first joined Zappa's ensemble in September 1972 for this tour, and stayed with the group until May 1975, and returned in 1988. His two brothers, Tom Fowler (b. 1951) and Walt Fowler (b. 1955) also played with Zappa at various intervals, as a bassist (1973-75) and trumpet player (April-May, 1974), respectively.

Provenance

Marty Perellis

Schubertiade Music LLC, Gabriel Boyers, 2009

From the private collection of Asher D. Atchick, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

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