Daniel Garber (1880-1958), Roger's Meadow, 1922, oil on canvas, $200,000-300,000

Born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1936, Heidi Bingham Stott (1936-2019) spent most of her early years in the Constitution State, graduating from Miss Porter’s School before attending the prestigious Sarah Lawrence College in New York.  The daughter of Dr. Charles T. Bingham (1906-1993), she inherited the bold and eclectic collecting taste of her grandfather, the late Hiram Bingham (1875-1956), who served as Governor (1922-1924) and later as Senator (1924-1933) of Connecticut. In 1911, Hiram notably rediscovered the famous archaeological site of Machu Picchu.

After their wedding in 1984, Heidi Bingham Stott and her husband Robert L. Stott, Jr. (1930-2014) spent most of their life in New York, where Mr. Stott worked as Senior Partner of Wagner, Stott & Company, a member form of the New York Stock Exchange. It is in New York that the couple started to build their collection of Fine Art, thoughtfully picking each artwork. The works on offer reveal a particular predilection for the bold palette and vigorous brushwork typically associated with the Pennsylvania Impressionists whose glorification of the Pennsylvania landscape historically appealed to collectors in neighboring states.

Among the highlights of the Collection are three oils by Daniel Garber, including Roger’s Meadow, an important work from 1922 which Garber exhibited numerous times, including at the Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C. and the Woodmere Museum, Philadelphia, PA.  While on view at the artist’s second solo show at Macbeth Gallery in 1928, the painting received positive reviews for its celebration of the ordinary. Featured in the work is a red barn in a desolated landscape, whose exact location would have only been easily identifiable to Garber and his Philadelphia audience. Autumn Solebury ($30,000-50,000) and September Morning ($70,000-100,000)—the two other works by the artist in the Collection—feature the pastel-like tones and soft brushstrokes found in some of Garber’s earlier works. 

Edward Willis Redfield (1869-1965), Spring at Point Pleasant on the Delaware River, 1926 oil on canvas, $300,000-500,000

The anticipated highlight of the sale is Edward Redfield’s Spring at Point Pleasant on the Delaware River, one of the artist’s largest compositions, which captures all the hallmarks of his celebrated style. Executed en plein-air in 1926, the painting depicts in thick and short brushstrokes a plunging view of the Delaware River from the artist’s studio in Point Pleasant.

Fern Coppedge (1885-1951), Florentine Gold, 1926, oil on canvas, $25,000-40,000

Also of note is Florentine Gold, a rare view of the Arno River by Fern Coppedge, which the artist painted from the balcony of her hotel in Florence during her first and only trip to Italy in 1925. The composition is very similar to The Golden Arno, on loan from the New Hope Solebury School District at the James A. Michener Museum of Art, Doylestown.

George Sotter (1879-1953), Carversville House, oil on panel, $40,000-60,000

Two quintessential nocturne scenes by George Sotter, Moonlit Stream, Buckingham ($50,000-80,000) and Carversville House, will also be on offer. Set next to the artist’s home in Bucks County, they both reveal the artist’s mastery in capturing the glowing beauty of a cold winter night. Each scene is bathed by a soft moonlight that gently reflects off the water and the snow-covered landscape. Stars shine from high above while lit candles glow through the windows, conveying a sense of tranquility and soothing comfort. Works by William L. Lathrop, John F. Folinsbee and Samuel G. Phillips will also be presented.